Skip to main content

Full text of "Summer term of the Western State Normal School"

See other formats


G 



1MH 

OF THE 

■ »-' -^ ■-■-'■'•- 




fe 



TERN morhal 5C 



KRLRflPZOQ MICHICRN 

5UHHER BULLETIN 

June 24 to August 2, 1912 

VOL. VII Published Quarterly by the Normal School NO 4 

Entered at Postoffice at Kalamazoo as Second Clase Matter 



, 



SUMMER TERM 



OF THE 



Western 
State Normal School 

KALAMAZOO, MICH. 



Monday, June 24, to Friday, August 2 
1912 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/summertermofwest1912west 



Faculty of the Summer Term 

D. B. WALDO, A. M., President. 

HELEN BALCH, 

Art. 
♦EDITH BARNUM, 

First and Second Grades, Training School. 
ESTHER BRALEY, A. B., 

Librarian. 
ERNEST BURNHAM, A. M., 

Director of Rural School Department. 
C. H. CARRICK, A. B., Superintendent of Schools, Charlotte, 

Geography. 
ROBERT CHITTENDEN, 

Assistant Secretary. 
MARIE COLE, 

Clerk, Training School. 
W. E. CONKLING, Superintendent of Schools, Dowagiac, 

Civics. 
IDA M. DENSMORE, 

Director of Training School. 
JOHN B. FAUGHT, Ph. D., 

Mathematics. 
JOHN E. FOX, A. B., 

Physics. 
ANNA L. FRENCH, 

Assistant Librarian. 
LUCY GAGE, 

Director of Kindergarten. 
*EMELIA M. GOLDSWORTHY, 

Public School Art. 
BESSIE B. GOODRICH, 

Rural School Department. 
CYNTHIA A. GREEN, 

Rural School Management 
HILDRED HANSON, 

Public School Music. 
LUCIA HARRISON, A. B., 

Geography. 
L. H. HARVEY, Ph. D., 

Biology. 



4 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

T. P. HICKEY, A. B., 

History. 
J. C. HOCKENBERRY, Ph. D., 

Education. 
BEULAH HOOTMAN, 

Public School Music. 
V. R. HUNGERPORD, 

Commissioner of Schools, Van Buren Co. 

History. 
SOPHIE HUTZEL, A. B., 

German. 
GEORGE JILLSON, A. B., 

Mathematics. 
ELIZABETH JOHNSON, 

Fourth Grade, Training School. 
ADELE M. JONES, B. S., 

Domestic Art. 
B. L. JONES, A. B., 

English Language and Literature. 
MATIE LEE JONES, 

Physical Training. 
CHRISTINE M. KECK, Grand Rapids, 

English. 
♦CATHERINE KOCH, B. S., 

Nature Study and Agriculture. 
ALICE L. MARSH, B. S., 

English. 

william Mccracken, Ph. d., 

Chemistry. 
NELLIE McCONNELL, 

Second Grade, Training School. 
KATHERINE MULRY, 

Sixth Grade, Training School. 
KATHERINE NEWTON, 

Secretary. 
G. N. OTWELL, Commissioner of Schools, Berrien County, 

Arithmetic. 
MAUDE PARSONS, A. B., 

Latin. 
♦JOHN PHELAN, A. B., 

Rural School Department. 
♦FLORENCE PRAY, B. S., 

Domestic Science. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 

ROBERT M. REINHOLD, B. Pd., 

Education and Normal Extension. 
G. EDITH SEEKELL, 

Fifth Grade, Training School. 
M. J. SHERWOOD, 

Manual Training. 
*W. H. SPAULDING, A. B., 

Director of Athletics. 
♦LAVINA SPINDLER, 

Eighth Grade, Training School. 
♦GEORGE SPRAU, A. M., 

English Language and Literature. 
EMELIE TOWNSEND, B. S., 

Seventh Grade, Training School. 
GEORGE S. WAITE, 

Manual Training. 
CAROLINE WAKEMAN, Ph. B., 

History. 
EVA WARRINER, Director County Normal, Marshall. 

Reading and Orthography. 
MINNIE WILLIAMSON, 

English. 
*L. H. WOOD, A. M., 

Geography. 
♦ELISABETH ZIMMERMAN, A. B., 

German. 



* Absent on leave. 



Summer Term of the Western 
State Normal School 




| HE ninth annual summer term of the Western State 
Normal School will open June 24 and continue six 
weeks, closing August 2. Students will be enrolled 
and classified on Monday, June 24, and classes in all 
departments will begin recitations on Tuesday, June 25. 
Nearly all of the regular instructors of the Normal School will 
remain in residence during the Summer term, and will be 
assisted by a number of outside teachers, selected for their 
efficiency in special lines of work. 

LOCATION 

The Western State Normal School is located at Kalama- 
zoo, the County Seat of Kalamazoo County, in the heart of 
Southwestern Michigan. In beauty, in accessibility, in gen- 
eral educational advantages, this thriving city of forty thou- 
sand inhabitants affords an ideal location for the school. 

Kalamazoo is at the intersection of the great lines of 
travel in Western Michigan. It is the half-way point between 
Detroit and Chicago on the main line of the Michigan Central 
Railway, which is here crossed by the Grand Rapids and 
Indiana, the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern, and the Chi- 
cago, Kalamazoo and Saginaw railroads, all running north and 
south. It is the eastern terminus of the South Haven branch 
of the Michigan Central which gives excellent connections 
with Chicago by boat. It is also the eastern terminus of the 
Kalamazoo, Lake Shore and Chicago Railroad. The Chicago 
and Grand Trunk Railway now has direct connection with the 
main line of that road by way of Pavilion. The electric lines 
of the Michigan United Traction Company give trolley connec- 
tions with the eastern part of the State via Battle Creek and 
Jackson. On the various steam railways more than fifty 
trains arrive and depart daily, giving excellent connections 
with the surrounding territory. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 7 

The advantages of Kalamazoo as a place of residence are 
unquestioned. The city is beautiful in situation, and is well 
kept. The climate is healthful, the water supply excellent, 
and the sanitary conditions are unusually good. Situated in 
the center of a fine farming country, it is itself widely known 
for its diversified industries. 

PURPOSE OF THE SCHOOL 

The object of the school as constituted by law is to pre- 
pare teachers for public school service. The work of the 
school is organized and conducted essentially to this end. It 
is recognized that scholarship, knowledge of child nature, and 
a proper attitude toward the work of teaching are the three 
essential factors in all professional preparation for teachers. 
The course of study in the Western State Normal School has 
been planned with the purpose of providing for these ends by 
giving as thorough knowledge of the subject matter as possi- 
ble in the time devoted to the work by emphasizing the prin- 
ciples underlying the educational process, and by keeping 
before the mind of the student the realization that the highest 
aim of education is character. All facilities possible will be 
offered for the furtherance of these purposes and for bringing 
the student into contact with the best in modern thought and 
life. The spirit of hearty cooperation between faculty and 
students in enterprises and interests of the school will be 
fostered at all times. 

The responsibility for the proper attitude of students 
toward the school and community is necessarily for the most 
part thrown upon the students themselves. While it is the 
purpose of the school to incite the student continually to 
higher and better ideals of character and public service, it is 
impracticable for a Normal School to attempt the task of 
reforming young men and young women. No personal effort 
will be spared in assisting students in every possible way. But 
those who are manifestly lacking in the essentials of good 
character, or in ability to become efficient instructors of chil- 
dren, will be requested, whenever the evidence of their unfit- 
ness is complete, to withdraw from the school. 

During the summer term special attention will be given 
to those who are already teaching. Courses of study, plans 
of work, methods of instruction, will be shaped to the needs 
of teachers now engaged in the profession. 



8 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

BUILDINGS 

The classes of the regular certificate courses will meet 
as heretofore in the Normal building. This structure con- 
tains, in addition to the administration offices, fourteen class- 
rooms, an assembly room and laboratory facilities for work in 
biological and physical sciences. The site occupied by the 
building is already well known for the panoramic view 
afforded of Kalamaozo City and the Kalamazoo River Valley. 

Review classes will meet in the training building. The 
training building is a splendid structure with two stories and 
a basement, 118 feet long and 100 feet wide. This structure 
is regarded as one of the best planned of its kind in the entire 
country. In completeness and convenience the building is a 
model. 

The gymnasium is the largest of its kind to be found 
among the normal schools and colleges of the Northwest Terri- 
tory. The main room is 119 feet long and 68 feet wide, the 
floor being entirely clear of posts or obstructions of any kind. 
The running track, 12 feet above the main floor, is suspended 
from the structural steel supporting the roof. The track is 
9Mj feet in width, and has sloping sides and ends as well as 
raised corners. In the basement are shower baths for both 
men and women, and a swimming pool 52 feet long. All classes 
in public school gymnastics will meet in the gymnasium. 

EQUIPMENT. 

The library now numbers over 8,000 volumes and consists 
entirely of good working material. It has been selected from 
the latest as well as the standard authors in the various 
departments. The stacks are open to all students during the 
summer term. Students of the Western Normal are also per- 
mitted to use the Kalamazoo City library which now numbers 
over 44,000 volumes. 

The departments of physics and chemistry are well sup- 
plied wit}] apparatus and there are facilities for effective work 
in biology. The department of geography is splendidly equip- 
ped with all needed apparatus. The departments of manual 
training, domestic art and domestic science are well supplied 
with the equipment needed for first class work. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 9 

THE RAILROAD 

Students having recitations at the Normal building will 
be afforded free transportation on the two track railway 
belonging to the Normal School. Two cars will be in opera- 
tion daily during the entire summer, thus removing all objec- 
tions on the part of those who find hill climbing irksome. 

FEES AND LIVING EXPENSES. 

Students in all courses who are residents of Michigan will 
pay a fee of $3 for the term. Students who reside in other 
states or in foreign countries will pay a fee of $5 for the 
term. This small tuition fee admits to all classes. No charge 
is made for the special lecture courses offered during the 
summer term. All students pay an athletic fee of fifty cents. 

Board in clubs costs about $3 per week, and rooms con- 
veniently located and suitably furnished may be obtained at a 
cost ranging in price from 75 cents to $1.00 per week for each 
student. The total expense for the summer term should not 
exceed $35.00 to $40.00. 

CREDIT. 

Credits applying on the certificate courses may be earned 
in any of the subjects, regularly required. Twenty-four weeks 
(one-half of a full terms credit) is usually the maximum credit 
for any student during the summer term. Classes reciting 
daily ordinarily earn six weeks' credit, while those recit- 
ing twice each day earn twelve weeks' credit. Review 
classes are not credited on the certificate courses except in the 
Rural School department. 

DEMAND FOR TEACHERS 

There is an increasing demand for trained teachers 
throughout the state and in the country at large. The trend 
of salaries is upward, and teaching is nearer a profession than 
ever before. Graduates of the Western Normal are in great 
demand and much care is exercised in placing students of the 
school where the likelihood of success and the opportunity to 
serve are greatest. 



10 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

The city of Kalamazoo affords many opportunities for 
remunerative employment both for young men and young 
women. Students desiring work with a view to lessening the 
expense of attending school are assisted in securing employ- 
ment of various kinds. 

ATHLETICS AND SOCIAL FEATURES. 

Due attention will be given to various forms of athletics 
during the summer term. Baseball and tennis will be promi- 
nent features of outdoor athletics. Five tennis courts will be 
at the disposal of students, and attention will also be given 
to other outdoor games and sports that may be used in public 
schools. 

As in former years, a social committee, selected from 
the faculty, will provide special features of entertainment with 
a view to securing a variety of interests and affording oppor- 
tunities for extending acquaintanceship among the students. 

Social gatherings similar to those of last summer, which 
will be so pleasantly remembered by all students who were in 
attendance, will be included in the general program which has 
been planned for the enjoyment of members of the summer 
school. 

GENERAL STUDENT PARTIES. 

Thursday evening, June 27, 8 P. M., School Party. 
Wednesday evening, July 3, 8 P. M., School Party. 
Friday evening, July 12, 8 P. M., School Party. 
Thursday evening, July 25, 8 P. M., School Party. 

COURSES OFFERED. 

The work offered in the summer term is as follows: 

1. Regular Certificate Courses. 

2. Review Courses. 

3. Extension Course. 

4. Lectures. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 11 

REGULAR CERTIFICATE COURSES. 

A large number of classes will be formed in the branches 
included in the regular certificate courses. Several of these 
classes in the Life Certificate and Graded Certificate groups 
will meet twice daily, thus enabling a student to cover the 
work of two twelve-weeks studies during the summer term. 
Classes will be formed in a wide variety of subjects in the 
departments of Psychology and Education, English Language 
and Literature, Expression, Geography, Science, Mathematics, 
History and Civics, German and Latin, Drawing, Music, Man- 
ual Training, Domestic Economy, Kindergarten Theory, 
Library Methods and Physical Training. 

REVIEW COURSES 

Review classes will be formed in all of the common school 
branches. These classes will be of special benefit to students 
and teachers who are preparing for the county examinations 
to be held in August. Opportunity will be offered for review- 
ing subjects included in the first, second and third grade exam- 
inations. There will be no summer schools or institutes this 
year in the counties near Kalamazoo, and all teachers are 
urged to take advantage of the unusual privileges offered at 
the Western State Normal. Credits earned during the six 
weeks' term are recorded, and in some subjects apply on 
certificate courses. There will be thorough reviews, and in 
addition courses will be so arranged in many subjects that 
students attending two or more summer terms may pursue 
work in a given study without duplicating subject matter. 

The subjects in which review courses will be offered are 
Physiology, United States History, Civil Government, Gram- 
mar, Arithmetic, Geography, Reading, Orthography, Theory 
and Art of Teaching, School Law, Course of Study, Algebra, 
Botany, General History, Physics, and Geometry. 

EXTENSION COURSE. 

In 1905 the State Board authorized the granting of an 
extension life certificate to mature students who (1) are high 
school graduates, (2) have taught six years, and (3) under 



12 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

the direction of the Western State Normal School faculty have 
completed work as follows: (a) three summer terms in resi- 
dence, (b) two years of non-resident work. This non-resident 
work is either (1) class work at some center within range of 
the school so that an instructor can meet the students once 
a week, usually on Saturdays, or (2) carefully organized 
courses taken by correspondence. 

The Western State Normal School, from its foundation, 
has permitted properly qualified students to avail themselves 
of this opportunity. During the past six years sixty-two stu- 
dents have completed this course. 

The object of this arrangement has been to meet the needs 
of those who are otherwise deprived of opportunities for growth 
and advancement. The danger that in some cases has been 
anticipated that students by taking this course would be led 
aside from undertaking resident study, has not proved real. 
Tn fact, one of the important results has been the number of 
students who, after undertaking the extension course, have 
come to see that it was more possible than they had thought 
to enter upon and complete the life certificate course in resi- 
dence. 

A higher grade of work is necessary to satisfy the require- 
ments than the average of class residence accomplishment. 
It is the student whose experience has trained him to effective 
methods of organization who can profit most by studying under 
the direction of an absent instructor. 

A special announcement of this department has been 
printed, which will be furnished on application to the Secre- 
tary. 

LECTURES. 

As heretofore, the Normal will offer unusual privileges 
this summer in the way of lecture courses by distinguished 
educators. A prominent lecturer will be at the school during 
each week of the term, and the discussions will be along the 
lines that are of interest to progressive teachers. 

It has been decided to limit the number of lecture days 
each week, so as to leave three or four afternoons open to field 
work, recreation, and athletics. Hours have been carefully 
arranged for the lecture courses to avoid conflict with 
classes and other important features of the summer school. 
Friday, Dr. Charles H. Judd of the University of Chicago, will 
June 28 lecture on "The Cultivation of Initiative in Stu- 
dents." Dr. Judd is most pleasantly remembered 



n 
r 
> 

C/2 



O 
C 

c 




SUMMER BULLETIN 13 

by former students who were at the Western Normal during 
the summer sessions of 1909 and 1910. He is one of the 
ablest students of education in the United States and in clear, 
forceful and inspiring discussion of educational problems holds 
the highest rank. 

Friday, Dr. W. C. Bagley of the University of Illinois, will 
July 5 speak on one of the following topics: 1. "Some 
Neglected Outcomes of Teaching." 2. "Crises 
and Criticisms in Education." 3. "The Test of Efficiency in 
Reading." Dr. Bagley is well known through his educational 
writings, particularly through two of his latest books "Crafts- 
manship in Teaching" and "Educational Values." He is at the 
head of the department of education at the University of Illi- 
nois and is one of the foremost of the educational leaders of 
America. Dr. Bagley is a most effective speaker and will be 
thoroughly enjoyed by those who hear him. 
Saturday afternoon, Hon. P. P. Claxton of Washington, D. C, 
July 13 Commissioner of Education of the 

United States will deliver an educa- 
tional address. Dr. Claxton until recently was President of 
the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. He has an estab- 
lished reputation as an orator. His coming will be the first 
appearance of a United States Commissioner of Education at 
the Western Normal. 

Wednesday, Mr. Charles Seymour, who lectured at Western 
July 17 Normal during the summer term of 1907, will 

deliver two addresses. Mr. Seymour has met 
with unusual success in presenting historical subjects before 
university and college audiences and to teachers' associa- 
tions and institutes. Mr. Seymour's lectures represent first 
hand study under advantageous conditions, as he has carried 
on research studies in libraries of Europe as well as of the 
United States. He has personally visited the places where 
the events pictured by him occurred and where his charac- 
ters lived. 

Tuesday, On Tuesday, July 23, the Hon. O. T. Corson, ex- 
July 23 Commissioner of Education in the State of Ohio, 
will give an address on "The Teacher's Surplus." 
For fifteen years Mr. Corson has been a well known lecturer 
before teachers' institutes and state associations. He is re- 
garded as one of the ablest educational lecturers of the United 
States. 



14 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Details of Departments 



Courses bearing numbers from 1 to 99 are offered in the 
Review, High School, and Rural Departments; those from 101 
to 199 receive credit in the Graded School and Life Certificate 

Courses in the High School and Rural School Depart- 
ments which are the same as the courses in the Graded School 
and Life Certificate work, are given the numbers of the latter. 

ART 

GRADED AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES. 

101. Nature Study and Expression. Illustration and 
drawing from nature. A course in drawing which takes up 
the work of simple illustration and drawing from nature as 
should be studied in the grades. This work is carried on into 
simple design in connection with the drawing from nature. 
A short course in the study of pictures is taken up in connec- 
tion with the illustration. 12 weeks credit. MISS BALCH. 

102. Perspective. Aside from the development of tech- 
nical skill in representing objects which involve principles of 
perspective, this course also aims to teach the use of these 
forms in decorative composition and design. It takes up such 
work as should be taught in the grades and in high schools. 
12 weeks credit. MISS JUDSON. 

103. Construction. This course takes up the subject of 
hand work in the grades, and includes the working out of sim- 
ple problems in weaving, basketry, clay modeling, stenciling, 
and bookbinding. This course may be taken without previous 
courses in Art. 6 weeks credit. MISS JUDSON. 

Advanced Art. This course is planned for those who have 
had the courses given and who would like to gain skill in 
representation, design and sketching. Some applied design 
will also be offered such as the work in bookbinding, leather 
work and block printing. 12 weeks credit. MISS BALCH. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 15 



BIOLOGY 



REVIEW, RURAL AND HIGH SCHOOL COURSES. 

7. Physiology. An elementary review course for teachers 
preparing for the fall examinations. While the functions of 
the various systems of the body will be especially emphasized, 
yet enough anatomy will be given to furnish an understand- 
ing of the various organs. Peabody's Physiology will form the 
basis of the course. Bring all available text books. 

DR. HARVEY. 

8. Botany. A review course designed to prepare teachers 
for the county examination. Bergen's Elements of Botany will 
form the basis of this course. Bring all text books available. 
Four periods a week. DR. HARVEY. 

GRADED SCHOOL AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES 

III. Nature Study. The place of Nature Study in the 
curricula of the elementary and rural school is definitely 
assured. Most teachers feel a lack of preparation not only 
in regard to subject matter, but in methods of presentation. 
The purpose of this course is to present the ideals and meth- 
ods of nature study, to acquaint the student with available 
materials and give him a grasp of the literature of the sub- 
ject. School gardens receive attention. Seasonal phenomena 
of plant and animal life are treated. Field and laboratory 
work are devoted to identification and ecology of our common 
plant and animal forms — especial stress being placed upon 
tree, bird, flower and insect study. Kalamazoo offers in its 
diverse habitats many localities of unusual interest, making 
an ideal center for Nature Study work. Students should bring 
clothing suitable for tramping, collecting cases, hand lenses, 
etc. Four afternoons of each week will be devoted to the 
work. Substitutes for Biology 107 and 108 in meeting require- 
ments. 12 weeks credit. DR. HARVEY. 



16 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

CHEMISTRY 

REVIEW AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES. 

1, 2. General Inorganic Chemistry. This course will be de- 
voted to a study of either the metals or the non-metals accord- 
ing to the needs of those taking the course. Laboratory work 
is required. Twice daily, 12 weeks credit. 

dr. Mccracken. 

4. Review Chemistry. This course will include a rapid 
review of the whole field of inorganic chemistry. Especial 
stress will be laid upon the mathematical, theoretical and 
commercial aspects of the subject. Once daily. No credit. 

dr. Mccracken. 

5. Qualitative Analysis, corresponding to Course 105 of 
the regular school year. Lectures twice a week. Laboratory 
work arranged to suit the needs of those taking the course. 
Either 6 or 12 weeks credit. DR. McCRACKEN. 

6. Chemistry for the Grades. This is a nature study 
course corresponding to Course 109 of the regular school year. 
A study will be made of some of the common elements — oxy- 
gen, hydrogen, nitrogen, chlorine, carbon, sulphur, — -and of 
some of the more common and important compounds used by 
man. There will be used for illustration a series of simple 
experiments capable of being used in the grades. Twice 
daily. 12 weeks credit. DR. McCRACKEN. 

PHYSICS 

REVIEW AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES. 

Review Physics. This course is designed for those who 
have had a year's work in physics and who wish to review 
the subject for second grade, first grade, or state life certifi- 
cate examinations. It is also designed for those who wish to 
increase their efficiency as teachers of physics in the schools. 
Class meets twice daily. MR. FOX. 

102a. Physics for Grade Teachers. The aim of this 
course is to help students to grasp the underlying principles of 
physics so essential to an understanding of general science 
work In the grades. The course presupposes a year's work 
in high school physics. Six weeks credit. MR. FOX. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 17 

Physical Laboratory Work. Arrangements will be made 
for those who wish to do laboratory work, to fit the needs of 
the pupil. Credit will depend upon the work accomplished. 

MR. FOX. 

DOMESTIC ART 

103a. Plain Sewing. A combination of machine and hand 
work in the making of a four-piece suit of underwear. Dis- 
cussions on pattern making, materials, and various methods 
of finishing and trimming. 6 weeks credit. MISS JONES. 

103b. Dressmaking. This course aims to give the stu- 
dent a practical knowledge of drafting, designing, making, 
fitting and finishing tailored shirt waist suits and simple sum- 
mer dresses. Each student will make a shirt waist and 
tailored skirt of a suitable cotton or linen material, and a 
simple muslin dress. 6 weeks credit. MISS JONES. 

110. Art Needlework. The object of this course is to 
acquaint the student with various kinds of embroidery and 
artistic needlework. The work will include applique, hem- 
stitching, simple drawn work, feather stitching, Bermuda 
fagoting, fancy darning, scalloped edges, dots, eyelets, and 
French embroidery, applied to household linens, pillows, table 
runners, and articles of clothing. 6 weeks credit. 

MISS JONES. 

Note — The student will be expected to furnish all mate- 
rials. Course 110 offered providing there is a suflicient num- 
ber of students enrolled. 
Domestic Science 

Domestic Science 

107. This course offers practical work in the cooking 
of all classes of foods, such as cereals, vegetables, meat, eggs, 
bread, pastry, salads and dessert. 

The work is planned to meet the needs of those outside 
of the Domestic Science department who desire practical work 
in cooking. 6 w r eeks credit will be given but will not apply on 
the two year course in Domestic Science. MISS MOORE. 

108. This course includes the planning, cooking and 
serving of meals at various costs. It is desired that those 
entering this class should have had some work in cooking. 
A credit of 6 weeks will be given but it will not apply on the 
two year course in Domestic Science. MISS MOORE. 



18 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

EDUCATION 

GRADED SCHOOL, AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES. 

101. Elementary Psychology. The greater part of the 
time of tbis course will be given to gaining facility in dealing 
with the problems of elementary psychology and in the use 
of the necessary vocabulary and materials. It is intended 
also to lay the foundation for the student's later work in 
education and especially to assist him to a better understand- 
ing and control of his own methods of study. Required in 
Graded School and all Life Certificate Courses. 12 weeks 
credit. 

102. Child Study. By means of definite assignments for 
observation and the careful study of children, the student 
will have opportunity to gain further acquaintance with the 
interests and activities of the various stages of child life and 
youth. This will be supplemented by the reading of some 
of the more significant studies that have been made and by 
acquaintance with the more important conclusions and prob- 
lems that have been formulated. Required in Graded School 
and General Life Certificate Courses. Prerequisite, Course 
101. 6 weeks credit. MR. REINHOLD. 

106. History of Modern Education. The development of 
the school in its relation to other social organizations Espe- 
cial attention will be given to the historical conditions and 
the men most significant in the understanding of present-day 
problems. Required in all Life Certificate Courses. Pre- 
requisite, 102, 103, 104 or 105. 12 weeks credit. 

DR. HOCKENBERRY. 

107. Advanced Psychology. The aim of this course is a 
careful study of such problems in psychology and education 
as the learning process, the reasoning process, habituation 
and inhibition in the light of the student's previous expe- 
rience and training and with the aid of as much experimenta- 
tion as is practicable in the class and in small groups of the 
class. It will be aimed so to formulate the results of this 
study as to make it serviceable in teaching and as a basis for 
independent study and research. Prerequisite, 101, 12 weeks 
credit. MR. REINHOLD. 

108. School Organization and Administration. This 
course is intended primarily for those students who are or 



SUMMER BULLETIN 19 

intend to be superintendents or principals of schools. Jt 
will be of value, however, to other teachers who wish to un- 
derstand better the conditions of efficiency in school relation- 
ships. A study will be made of some of the books and 
periodical literature of the subject in an effort to determine 
influences which are manifesting themselves in school super- 
vision, curricula, organizations, etc. Elective. 6 weeks 
credit. MR. REINHOLD. 

109. School Hygiene. An introduction to material that 
has been produced in comparatively recent years through the 
study of personal and institutional problems of hygiene, espe- 
cially in relation to the school. Among the topics taken up 
will be the periods of development; school diseases; meas- 
urements and tests; time table; home study; examinations; 
fatigue; posture, medical inspection; school grounds, buildings 
and decoration, etc. Reports will be required of actual con- 
ditions found and of possible methods of improvement. Elec- 
tive. 6 weeks credit. DR. HOCKENBERRY. 

110. The Philosophy of Education. In this course it will 
be the endeavor to gain some idea of the principles of educa- 
tion in accordance with the relevant laws of biology, psychol- 
ogy, sociology and philosophy. Professor Home's "The Philos- 
ophy of Education" will serve as the basis of the work, but 
assignments will be made to the writings of Rosenkranz, Tate, 
Cole, Dewey, MacVannel and others who have attempted to 
state the nature of education in the light of its broader and 
deeper aspects. Elective. 6 weeks credit. 

DR. HOCKENBERRY. 

ENGLISH 

REVIEW, RURAL AND HIGH SCHOOL COURSES. 

7. Preparatory Grammar. The purpose of this course 
is a thorough review for those who are making preparation 
for the county examinations. It is not accepted as credit for 
the course in Grammar. MISS MARSH. 

99. Preparatory Composition. The elements of compo 
sition are treated under both form and content. The course 
deals with punctuation, word usage, paragraph and sentence 
structure, and business and social forms in letter writing. 



20 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Daily practice is afforded in both oral and written composi- 
tion. 12 weeks credit. MISS MARSH. 



GRADED SCHOOL AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES. 

101. English Composition. A practical course in the 
writing of essays, descriptive, narrative, expository, and 
critical. The first hour will be devoted to class-room discus- 
sion of text-book assignments and collateral readings, this to 
be supplemented by brief lectures on the more technical 
aspects of the subject. The second hour will be given up to 
class-room criticism of exercises, some previously prepared 
and others written impromptu. 12 weeks credit. 

MR. JONES. 

102. English Literature. Half of the time will be spent 
in outline studies of English literature from its beginnings 
to the present time; ana half in a more intensive study of the 
poets of the Romantic period, 1798 to 1832. The work of 
Coleridge, Wordsworth, Byron, Shelley, Keats, and Landor 
will be emphasized. 12 weeks credit. MR. JONES. 

103. Literary Material for the Grades. (Course 102 pre- 
requisite). The purpose of this course is to introduce the 
student teacher to material which is adapted to his work in 
the training school or for later independent class-room expe- 
rience. One hour is devoted daily to discussion and criticism; 
(1), of chapters in MacClintock's "Literature in the Elemen- 
tary School"; (2), of literary material mentioned in MacClin- 
tock considered from the points of view of its fitness for 
children in school, and of its value as real literature. The 
second hour is given up to lectures on the principles of liter- 
ary criticism and child study as related to literature; these 
lectures are supplemented by suggestions for guidance in 
reading and for the making of bibliographies. Required in 
Life and Graded School Courses. 12 weeks credit. 

MISS KECK. 

111. American Literature. The method ot presenting 
this course will be the same as that for "English literature 
102." "The Renaissance of New England" will receive the 
emphasis, particularly as related to the later writers of New 
JOngland: Whittier, Longfellow, Lowell, Holmes and Haw- 
tborne. 12 weeks credit MISS KECK 



SUMMER BULLETIN 21 

114. Teachers' Course in Grammar. This course em- 
braces i 

(a) Rapid academic review of the subject. 

(b) Comparative study of texts, using Whitney's "Essentials 

of English Grammar" as a basis. 

(c) Discussion of methods of teaching grammar in grades 

below the high school. 12 weeks credit. 

MISS MARSH. 

EXPRESSION 

REVIEW COURSES. 

1. Reading and Orthography. A careful study will be 
made of Hudson's "Introduction to the Study of Literature," 
one of the Reading Circle books. This book forms the basis 
for the county teachers' examinations in Reading in August, 
in Orthography a thorough study of Pattengill's Orthography 
will be made. MISS WARRINER. 

GRADED SCHOOL AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES. 

101. Reading. A study of the elements of expression and 
the application of these principles in reading of classic selec- 
tions. The course aims to develop expressive reading and 
effective teaching of reading. It puts special emphasis on 
fundamental principles and therefore should precede other 
courses. 12 weeks credit. MISS FORNCROOK. 

103. Story Telling. A study of the purpose of story tell- 
ing in school, and of selection of stories. Daily practice in 
telling stories should be preceded by English 103. 12 weeks 
credit. MISS FORNCROOK. 

104. Debate and Informal Speaking. Aims to develop 
ease in public speaking. Discussion of general topics and 
leading questions of the day. 6 weeks credit. 

MISS FORNCROOK. 

105. Drama and Festival. Study and interpretation of 
standard and modern plays or scenes from them. Aims to 
develop dramatic imagination and sympathy, to cultivate abil- 
ity to read drama interpretively and to give prospective 
teachers training in the staging of plays. Some time will 



22 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

also be given to the preparation and presentation of festivals. 
12 weeks credit. MISS FORNCROOK. 

Courses 103, 104 or 105 offered according to wishes of 
students. 

GEOGRAPHY 

REVIEW COURSE. 

5. Review Geography. This review course is planned to 
prepare for the examinations in August and October. 

MR. CARRICK. 

GRADED SCHOOL AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES. 

101A. Meteorology and Climatology. In this course 
which is an integral part of the work in general geography 
offered by the department, the chief emphasis is placed upon 
the distribution of those climatic elements that condition the 
distribution of life on the earth. 6 weeks credit. 

MISS HARRISON. 

101B. Physiography of the Land Forms. Study of the 
origin and distribution of the various land forms of the earth's 
surface by means of topographic maps and field exercises. 
The course also includes a brief study of the chief rocks and 
minerals. 6 weeks credit. MISS HARRISON. 

102A. Principles of Geography. This course should fol- 
low course 101A and 101B, since the work consists of the 
study of the distribution of life forms — in relation to climate 
and to the relief of the land. The study covers the more 
general life zones and regions of the earth. 6 weeks credit. 

MISS HARRISON. 

102B. Regional Geography. A study of the leading 
nations of Europe and of North America in a comparative 
way, emphasis being placed upon the commercial and indus- 
trial development. 6 weeks credit. MISS HARRISON. 

Note — These four courses cover the required work of the 
life course. Students of the graded school course desiring but 
one term of geography should take course 101A on Climate 
and course 102B on Regional Geography. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 23 

GERMAN 

GRADED SCHOOL AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES. 

101. Elementary Course. Twice daily. The aim of this 
course is to give the student a knowledge of the rudiments of 
German grammar and facility in reading and reproducing easy 
German. A number of texts will be read and discussed in Ger- 
man. 12 weeks credit. MISS HUTZEL. 

114. Advanced Course. The study of some drama or 
prose narrative, to be selected to meet the needs of the class. 
A review of German grammar and syntax and practice in 
speaking and writing the language. 6 weeks credit. 

MISS HUTZEL. 

115. Teacher's Course. This will be primarily a course 
in German conversation, especially designed for those who 
feel that their knowledge of the spoken language is inadequate 
for present day demands in modern language instruction. The 
work will consist of discussion of German texts in German 
and the writing of compositions and reproductions. 6 to 12 
weeks credit. MISS HUTZEL. 

HISTORY 

REVIEW, RURAL AND HIGH SCHOOL COURSES. 

7-8. English History. Elective in High School course. 
Special emphasis laid on the social and industrial develop- 
ment of England. 12 weeks credit. MISS WAKEMAN. 

12. General History. A review course for students ex- 
pecting to take the examination for second grade certificate. 
The class will meet twice daily. 12 weeks credit in High 
School Course. MISS WAKEMAN. 

13. United States History. A review course to meet the 
needs of students preparing for the August and October 
examinations. Four sections will be formed and a credit of 
12 weeks in the Rural School course may be earned. 

MR. HUNGERFORD. 

14. Civil Government. This course is planned primarily 
for students who wish to prepare for the August and October 



24 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

examinations. Four sections will be formed. Bring any text- 
books available. MR. CONKLING. 

GRADED SCHOOL AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES. 

101-2. United States History. Emphasis will be laid upon 
the different periods according to the needs of the class. Spe- 
cial attention will be given to choice of subject matter and 
bibliography suitable for grade work. 12 weeks credit. 

MR. HICKEY. 

106. Europe, 1643-1789. A study of important historical 

developments in Europe, with particular emphasis on the 

French Revolution and Napoleonic periods. 12 weeks credit. 

MR. HICKEY. 

KINDERGARTEN 

The Kindergraten will be open the first four weeks for 
observation and a limited number will be permitted to prac- 
tice. No credit. MISS GAGE. 

GAMES AND RHYTHMS. 

Open to all Elementary teachers. Emphasis will be 
placed upon the phychological significance of this phase of 
play showing how certain elements are characteristic of games 
for young children as contrasted with those played by older 
children. Opportunity will be given for original work in both 
rhythms and games. MISS GAGE. 

LATIN 

REVIEW, RURAL AND HIGH SCHOOL COURSES. 

2. Latin and Composition. This course is designed for 
those who are preparing to teach Latin, and those who have 
taught but feel the need of added drill in writing Latin. G 
weeks credit. MISS PARSONS. 

4, 7, or 10. Advanced Latin. Classes will be formed for 
those desiring work in Caesar, Cicero, or Virgil. These courses 
are designed for those who wish to continue the study of one 



SUMMER BULLETIN 25 

of these authors "in absentia," and the aim will be to give the 
student an insight into the life of the author, the historical 
background, and the method of study, which will enable him 
to continue the work without a teacher. 6 to 12 weeks credit. 

MISS PARSONS. 
1. A course in Beginning Latin, reciting twice daily. It is 
planned to cover the work of one term. 12 weeks credit. 

MISS PARSONS. 

LIBRARY METHODS FOR 
TEACHERS 

The courses in Library Methods for Teachers arranged by 
the State Board of Library Commissioners, will extend through 
the six weeks of the Summer School. Instruction will be 
given daily in the form of lectures and practical problems in 
connection with the Commission's special library. 
♦Subject to change. 

101. Two courses will be given; one in the elementary 
methods of library administration, accession, classification, 
cataloguing, etc. — given with the purpose of making it possible 
for the teacher in charge of the school library to care for it 
and use it in the most efficient way, rather than for the pur- 
pose of training professional librarians. 6 weeks credit. 

MISS BRALEY 

102. The second course will include more general work,— 
daily discussion of children's books taken from the selected 
library, use of lists and bibliographies, and one week each of 
lectures on Children's Reading and on Reference Books, given 
by specialists in these branches, sent by the Library Commit 
sion. The purpose of the work is to acquaint teachers with 
the best and most helpful material and method for work sup- 
plementary to the regular curriculum. 6 weeks credit. 

MISS BRALEY. 

MANUAL TRAINING 

Manual Training 102. Instruction in woodworking shops 
materials suitable for the pupils in the fifth and sixth grades. 
12 weeks credit. MR. WAITE. 



26 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Manual Training 103. Instruction in woodworking shops 
suitable for students of the seventh and eighth grades. Work 
in various kinds of wood, the use of woodworking tools of all 
kinds, and the finishing of the objects made. 12 weeks credit. 

MR. SHERWOOD. 

Manual Training 107-8. Economics of Manual Art. De- 
velopment of manual training in the United States; organiza- 
tion of courses of study; planning of rooms and buildings; 
selection and purchase of tools and materials; supervision of 
manual training work; manual training and technical schools 
of England, Scotland and Wales; lectures and discussions; 
topical reports. 12 weeks credit. MR. WAITE. 

Manual Training 109. Mechanical Drawing. Consists of 
simple elementary and geometrical problems, the use of in- 
struments, plans and elevations of simple objects, and simple 
lettering. 12 weeks credit. MR. SHERWOOD. 

Manual Training 110. Mechanical Drawing. Continuation 
of geometrical problems, more advanced drawings of objects, 
drawings of shop exercises, and lettering. 12 weeks credit. 

MR. SHERWOOD. 

Manual Training 111. Mechanical Drawing. Orthographic 
projections, development of surfaces and sheet metal patterns, 
machin© drawings. 12 weeks credit. MR. SHERWOOD. 

Manual Training 112. Mechanical Drawing. Isometric 
drawings, mechanical shading and drawings, designs for equip- 
ment for woodworking rooms, tracings and blue prints. 12 
weeks credit. MR. SHERWOOD. 

In the manual training courses instruction is given regard- 
ing materials and topical reports are required. In the classes, 
Ritchey's Manual Training and Economics of Manual Training, 
Rouillion, are used as text-books. Much reference work is 
done, all students having free access to the library, which is 
well equipped. Visits will be made to factories. 

In the summer term of 1912 work in manual training will 
be limited to the subjects enumerated above owing to the 
building changes of the Kalamazoo public schools. In the 
summer term of 1913 all of the shop work which has been 
offered in previous summer sessions will again be given. The 
regular manual training instructors will give full time to the 
teaching of the subjects above scheduled during the coming 
summer term. 



SUMMER BULLETIN. 27 

MATHEMATICS 

REVIEW, RURAL AND HIGH SCHOOL COURSES. 

I. Rural School Arithmetic. This course reviews the 
entire field of grade arithmetic, giving especial attention to the 
needs of the rural schools. Much attention will be given to 
problems bearing on farm and home life. In connection with 
the course, instruction will be given in grading pupils in arith- 
metic, and that part of the State Manual bearing on this sub- 
ject will be reviewed. 12 weeks credit. MR. JILLSON. 

7. Plane Geometry. Designed for those preparing for 
teacher's examination and those desiring a review of the sub- 
ject as a preparatory subject. Much attention is given to the 
methods of attack. MR. JILLSON. 

II. Advanced Algebra. This course will include a review 
of Fundamental Processes, Fractions and Simple Equations; 
Radicals and Exponents; Logarthims; Quadratic Equations; 
Graphs; Proportion, and Progressions. 12 weeks credit. 

MR. JILLSON. 

13 Arithmetic. A review for those desiring to prepare 
for teachers' examination. Sections will be organized for all 
grades of County Certificates. MR. OTWELL, 

14. Algebra. Review course for those preparing for 
teachers' examination or for students who wish to review the 
subject as a preparatory course. MISS GREEN. 

GRADED SCHOOL AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES. 

101. Arithmetic. A teacher's course. To elect this 
course the student should have a knowledge of geometry and 
of the beginners' course in psychology. The work consists 
of two parts, divided as follows: 

(a) A study of the origin of number and its use. The 
history of the development of the subject matter of arithmetic, 
and past and present day methods of teaching the subject. 
Assigned readings and class room discussions form a promi- 
nent part of this work. 

(b) Review of some of the more difficult parts of arith- 
metic 12 weeks credit. DR. FAUGHT. 

102. College Algebra. Arithmetical and geometrical 
progressions, binominal theorem, development of functions 
in series, logarithms, theory of equations, convergency and 
divergency of series, permutations and combinations. 12 
weeks credit. DR. FAUGHT. 



28 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

103. Plane Trigonometry. This is equivalent to the 
work done during the regular session. Solution of triangles 
by both natural and logarithmic functions. 12 weeks credit. 

DR. PAUGHT. 

Note — Either 102 or 103 will be given, according to the 
number of students electing one course or the other. 

MUSIC 

101. Elements of Vocal Music. This is an academic 
course, and should precede the Teachers' Course in Music. It 
presupposes no previous knowledge, but deals with the very 
rudiments of vocal music. It consists of the cultivation of 
the ear, the voice, and the beginning of sight singing. The 
course covered is that of Book One of any of the standard 
music courses, and may be eliminated by examination. 12 
weeks credit. MISS HOOTMAN. 

102. Elements of Vocal Music. This course must be pre- 
ceded by Course I or its equivalent. It consists of ear train- 
ing, voice culture, melodic writing of a single character, ad- 
vanced sight singing, and practice in part singing. 12 weeks 
credit. MISS HOOTMAN. 

103. Voice Culture I. This course includes both concert 
and individual work. Correct breathing, proper placing of the 
voice, clarity of tone, articulation and enunciation will be 
treated specifically. Some songs will be taken up for Inter- 
pretation. This course is open to all students. Laboratory 
credit, 3 or 6 weeks. MISS HANSON. 

106. Teachers' Course in Music. This must be preceded 
by course 101 or its equivalent. Advanced sight reading and 
ear training are taken up in this class, discussion of methods, 
and practice teaching during the class period as a preparation 
for teaching this subject in the first eight grades. Observa- 
tion is made in the training school. 12 weeks credit. 

MISS HANSON. 

107. Primary Songs and Games. This course is a sug- 
gestive one for teachers in the primary grades as well as for 
specializing students. The following phases will be devel- 
oped: Rhythm — feeling for and interpretation of different 
rhythms through games, balls, percussion instruments, folk 
dances and rhythmic steps. Songs, — a sequence applicable to 
seasons and school festivals and taken from the best com- 
posers of children's songs will be learned. The care of the 
child voice and the presentation of these two phases to the 
child will also be taken up. Ability to play the rhythmic stud- 



SUMMER BULLETIN 29 

ies and accompaniments is desirable and is required from 
specializing students in the kindergarten and music courses. 
Observation may be made in the training school. 6 weeks 
credit. MISS HOOTMAN. 

109. Harmony I. The work consists of ear training, 
and a study of construction of scales, intervals and chords. 
The writing of simple original settings for songs, and the 
harmonizing of easy melodies. Students must have had Ele- 
ments of Music I or its equivalent and be able to play chords, 
scales, and hymn tunes. 6 weeks credit. MISS HANSON. 

PENMANSHIP 

To meet a recognized need a course in Penmanship will 
be offered. Sections will be organized to meet in the morn- 
ing and afternoon, thereby affording an opportunity to all 
students to join one of the classes. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
FOR WOMEN 

110. A course of plays and games. Arranged to meet the 
needs of the child at the various stages of development. 
Games for indoor and outdoor use. 6 weeks credit. 

MISS JONES. 

102. A course in Folk Dancing. Folk dancing has taken 
an important place in the physical education of the child. In 
this course will be given dances suitable for each grade. 6 
weeks credit. MISS JONES. 

For those interested in Playground Work, Courses 101 
and 102 will have special interest. Course 101 is correlated 
with Courses 107 and 108, Games and Rhythms, offered in the 
Kindergarten department. 

Instruction in tennis and volley ball will be given each 
morning at 7:10. MISS JONES. 

Instruction in swimming will be given in the mornings 
by appointment. The pool is open to the women mornings. 

RURAL SCHOOLS 

A special department gives careful attention to the prepa- 
ration of teachers for country schools. The number of school 
districts in Michigan which pay a salary sufficient to command 
the services of specially prepared teachers, is rapidly increas- 
ing. The courses offered here, to fit teachers to meet succss- 
fully the progressive demands of the districts, are the result 
of experience accumulated in working at this problem through 



30 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

the eight years since the establishment of this institution. 
Teachers in attendance during the summer term are urged 
to take courses which will begin for them an accumulation of 
credits toward a State Normal school certificate. 

Courses are offered which are adapted to the best ad- 
vancement of the young people who seek special preparation 
for rural school teaching. Three groups of students are seek- 
ing this preparation: First, mature young people, with or 
without experience in teaching, who have had little or no high 
school instruction and who cannot attend for a whole high 
school course; second, students who wish to begin teaching 
at the conclusion of a regular four year high school course; 
and third, high school graduates who wish to give a year or 
a year and a summer to preparation for rural school teaching. 

A few students are now going from graduation in the life 
certificate course (two years of study after graduation from 
high school) to teaching in rural schools. It is suggested that 
they elect rural school method, rural sociology and agricul- 
ture. Holders of life certificates or graded school certificates, 
who expect to teach in the country the coming year will be 
directly helped by any of the special courses here offered. 
The attention of such students is called to the courses in 
Rural School Methods announced under "Teaching" on a 
subsequent page. 

The county commissioners of Southwestern Michigan who 
cooperated so heartily in the work last year are most cordially 
urged to spend as much time as possible in Kalamazoo during 
the weeks between June 24 and August 2. During the term 
there will be a series of conferences of commissioners to con- 
sider questions pertaining to the welfare of rural schools. 
Some one of the County School Commissioners present will 
lead in these discussions. On enrollment day each Commis- 
sioner present will have a place in which to confer with the 
teachers from his county, and all the term after 3:00 o'clock 
p. m. room 13 (the first room north of the assembly room on 
the second floor of the Normal building) will be at the dis- 
posal of any Commissioner who wishes to call the teachers 
of his county together for social or other purpose. In this 
room will be found exhibits of actual and suggested rursi 
school work. 

SPECIAL COURSES. 

In addition to the academic review, and methods courses 
offered in the several departments, three courses will be given 



SUMMER BULLETIN 31 

in the Rural School Department which will be planned for the 
specific purposes of putting the teachers of rural schools on 
terms of close familiarity with the applied problems of organ- 
ization, classification, and management of these schools; and 
the course of study, school laws, and community and indus- 
trial conditions by which their work is governed. 

1. School Management and Law. It will be the aim of 
this course to make as thorough a study as time will permit 
of the State Course of Study for rural schools, the General 
School Laws and School Management. Students owning 
McMurry's "How to Study and Teaching How to Study," and 
text-books in school management should bring them. The 
work will be supplemented by library references and inci- 
dental illustrations from the daily work of rural schools. The 
exhibits of actual rural school work from the counties and 
from the Normal's Rural Observation School will be closely 
studied. This course will directly aid all who are preparing 
for the August county teachers' examination, in three regular 
examination topics: Theory and Art, Course of Study, and 
School Law. As many sections will be organized as the en- 
rollment makes advisable. All who complete this course will 
be given 6 weeks credit in the regular Rural School Course. 

MR. BURNHAM. 
MISS GREEN. 

2. Rural Social Service. A directed course in reading in 
Rural Social Service will be amplified by discussion for the 
purpose of calling the attention of teachers to the great possi- 
bilities in rural social life and inspiring them to take part 
intelligently in local activities, which make for rural progress. 
All who complete this work will be given 6 weeks credit in 
the regular Rural School Course. MR. BURNHAM. 

3. Agriculture. This course aims to give the student a 
general conception of the possibilities of the various phases ©f 
agriculture in the rural school. This will include the use of 
a text-book, lectures, visits to neighboring farms and cream- 
eries and experimental work in the School Garden. Four 
hours a week, 6 weeks credit. 

TEACHING 

101. General Methods. (1) A study of the elementary 
school curriculum with consideration of the subject matter 



62 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

best suited to the interests, and needs of each period of child- 
hood. (2) The problem of motivation of school work. 
(3) A discussion of types of lessons and the making of les- 
son plans. (4) Systematic observation of different phases 
of grade work in the training school, with reports and class 
discussion. 12 weeks credit. MISS GOODRICH. 

7. Rural School Methods. The preceding course will be 
given in two sections one for graded school, the other for rural 
school teachers. In the latter course special problems of the 
rural school will be considered and emphasis will be given to 
the construction work and seat work possible in rural schools. 
At least one-half hour daily of observation in the training 
school is required. 6 weeks credit. MISS GOODRICH. 

TRAINING SCHOOL 

In addition to the kindergarten, the first and second, 
fourth and sixth grades of the training school will be in ses- 
sion from 9 to 11 a. m. each day for four weeks of the sum- 
mer term, to accommodate those who wish to observe teach- 
ing in the grades. The regular critic teachers will have 
charge of this work, with the cooperation of the special 
teachers in drawing, music, manual training, physical train- 
ing, domestic art, and domestic science. The work will aim 
to present proper material for use in the various subjects of 
the curriculum, such as nature study, geography, reading and 
language, and the special branches, including handwork, as 
well as to show good methods of teaching. 

It is hoped that large numbers of the students will avail 
themselves of the help thus afforded them. No Normal 
School credit is offered for this work. Commissioners may 
arrange with the director, however, for reports of attendance 
of their teachers. Observation will be required in connection 
with the courses in General Methods and Rural School Meth- 
odss. Each critic will reserve the 11 o'clock period for con- 
ference and general discussion with the observers in the 
grade and it is expected that students observing will attend 
at least one conference each week. 

Students taking observation in any course, should fill 
out cards in the office of the Training School as soon as their 
regular enrollment is completed. 

MTSS DENSMORE and CRTTIC TEACHERS. 






3 0112 105844135